Arizona Hay Report: 07/19/2014

Arizona Hay Report Here

July 19, 2014

Alfalfa Prices Now Expected to Rise

For the week ending on July 7, fully 56 percent of U.S. pastures and ranges were rated as good to excellent. This compares with 49 percent in 2013. In California, New Mexico, and Arizona, where soil moisture is lacking due to drought conditions, between 58 and 75 percent of pasture and ranges are rated as poor to very poor. Demand for dairy hay in California and sections of the Southwest is likely to place pressure on local supplies, encouraging movement of hay from the Midwest to these areas and providing support for robust alfalfa prices.

Hay stocks on U.S. farms, May 1, 2013, 2014
May 1, 2013 May 1, 2014
(1,000 tons) (1,000 tons)
Alabama 215 300
Arizona 35 35
Arkansas 170 550
California 320 140
Colorado 360 320
Connecticut 7 8
Delaware 3 2
Florida 25 55
Georgia 250 170
Idaho 570 320
Illinois 155 310
Indiana 110 200
Iowa 290 410
Kansas 460 1,340
Kentucky 470 700
Louisiana 150 105
Maine 22 18
Maryland 75 70
Massachusetts 12 19
Michigan 140 270
Minnesota 490 440
Mississippi 200 160
Missouri 600 1,800
Montana 860 875
Nebraska 610 1,150
Nevada 140 45
New Hampshire 10 6
New Jersey 15 22
New Mexico 105 90
New York 150 330
North Carolina 240 220
North Dakota 880 1,200
Ohio 140 275
Oklahoma 700 1,100
Oregon 230 210
Pennsylvania 300 300
Rhode Island 1 1
South Carolina 110 95
South Dakota 850 1,480
Tennessee 425 630
Texas 1,650 1,350
Utah 230 300
Vermont 36 45
Virginia 410 470
Washington  140 290
West Virginia 145 235
Wisconsin 410 435
Wyoming 200 280

All

hay

Alfalfa/

alfalfa mixtures

 

2013

2014*

2013

2014*

Alabama**

790

750

(NA)

(NA)

Arizona

285

305

250

270

Arkansas

1,335

1,225

5

5

California

1,440

1,370

900

930

Colorado

1,310

1,330

650

750

Connecticut

47

54

7

7

Delaware

18

14

6

4

Florida**

300

320

(NA)

(NA)

Georgia**

580

580

(NA)

(NA)

Idaho

1,480

1,470

1,120

1,080

Illinois

660

650

340

320

Indiana

640

600

280

240

Iowa

1,170

1,080

730

730

Kansas

2,750

2,550

550

550

Kentucky

2,600

2,630

200

180

Louisiana**

400

410

(NA)

(NA)

Maine

135

150

10

10

Maryland

225

180

30

30

Massachusetts

84

82

9

11

Michigan

940

970

610

640

Minnesota

1,900

1,800

950

1,000

Mississippi**

720

600

(NA)

(NA)

Missouri

4,050

3,920

350

320

Montana

2,800

2,750

1,800

1,850

Nebraska

2,500

2,370

700

720

Nevada

345

390

210

250

New Hampshire

50

49

5

4

New Jersey

97

106

17

14

New Mexico

230

335

145

220

New York

1,430

1,390

350

320

North Carolina

858

778

8

8

North Dakota

2,620

2,380

1,620

1,540

Ohio

1,070

1,050

330

330

Oklahoma

3,130

3,510

230

310

Oregon

1,020

1,050

400

390

Pennsylvania

1,260

1,290

340

340

Rhode Island

8

7

1

1

South Carolina**

290

280

(NA)

(NA)

South Dakota

3,050

3,220

1,800

1,820

Tennessee

1,915

1,866

15

16

Texas

5,640

5,440

140

140

Utah

725

710

550

550

Vermont

180

170

35

35

Virginia

1,240

1,275

90

75

Washington

760

920

410

470

West Virginia

590

570

20

20

Wisconsin

1,600

1,600

1,100

1,150

Wyoming

990

1,100

450

540

United States

58,257

57,646

17,763

18,190

Source: USDA Acreage Report, June 30, 2014

* Forecasted

** Other and

alfalfa combined

 

 

 

 

6 Responses to "Arizona Hay Report: 07/19/2014"
  1. Jeff says:

    Pecos Farm changed names to Riggs North Farm, its on Riggs Rd. and Old Price Rd. They have hay for sale right now at $12.50 per bale. Their website is http://www.Arizona-Hay.com and has contact information on there.

  2. Claudia says:

    is there contact info for Pecos Fram?

  3. Steve says:

    Just bought some Timothy hay at Pecos Farm in Sun Lakes for $10 a 55# bale. I think they have timothy / alfalfa too.

  4. Ron says:

    This year was the worst drought in decades in America. Hay production was down all over the country. When hay production is down in other regions, states like Texas and Florida (big horse hay markets) have to start buying from other regions. This lowers supply and increases prices. Then in the winter, there is less hay supply because no new hay is produced anywhere in North America. It’s true supply and demand. That is why hay prices are going up. You are not getting ripped off, its just the markets. Also keep in mind that shipping and logistics is more costly (less of it) in Flagstaff which increases prices over a Phoenix market. If you are buying directly from a farm up there, they are going to follow market prices, so they will charge more. Hope that explains a little.

  5. Gay Spivey says:

    What the hell! we’re gettin ripped off. Hay is 4-5 buck cheaper in the valley than it is in Flagstaff. If hay is gonna go up for the winter at least give horse owner a valid reason why! so we can understand. Last year was a texas drought so what the ecuse this year?

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